Holding Hands

What is Naturopathy and how does it work ?

A naturopath is a university qualified complimentary health practitioner who has been trained in medical science to identify some of the underlying causes of disease, based on a thorough case history as given by the patient. An initial consultation is usually at least 1hour and your practitioner will ask you lots of questions, not just about current symptoms but also what health symptoms may have come up for you in the past as a child or as an adult.

A naturopath is not trained to diagnose or treat disease but rather to identify areas of weakness in the body that could benefit from support. Support may come in the form of :


- dietary and lifestyle advice (such as avoiding certain foods that may cause more inflammation or helping you to set a regular alarm on your phone so you get to bed at the same time each night if you are struggling to get a good nights sleep)   


- herbal or nutritional medicines which may help certain organs to function optimally with minimal side effects or drug interactions.

Life's Beautiful

The body needs all of its organs working optimally and maintaining a unique rhythm to be symptom free.

 

Symptoms may appear if one organ (such as the stomach) isn't working as well as it should. It will set off a chain reaction that causes disharmony and dysfunction within the network of body systems it interacts with (intestines, bowel, liver etc)

 

This eventually gives rise to uncomfortable body symptoms. A boat with one oar is still an boat, but a boat with two oars will function so much better, keep itself steady and get its passenger headed in the right direction without going in circles. 

Most naturopaths will often share a passion for educating on body processes and organ function helping people to reclaim their health by taking the mystery out of the body and how it works. 

We all have a body, but not all of us understand its strange ways.

So when it dysfunctions or "plays up" and shows signs and symptoms of dis-ease, this can be the body's way of communicating to us that something is wrong.

 

If we don't address the underlying cause and only cover up the symptoms with relieving medications, it is typical that disease processes will continue and get worse over time to the point that we require more and more medication or need to have further investigations (blood tests, examinations or surgeries) to work out what is going wrong. 

When we discover and address the cause of illness early, we can support the body's own natural healing processes and in this way naturopathy is often referred to as preventative medicine.